So what is frit? Crushed glass used by lampworkers and fusers to add color and design to their glass creations.

My EGA friend Rhonda Willis from www.rwillisglassartist.etsy.com shares with us a great way to make frit:

A friend of mine works at a local glass store, and she is always coming up with wonderful ideas. Well, her dad (an engineer) came up with this idea for a home-made frit maker. After seeing it, I made a quick dash to the Home Depot (Lowe’s or Ace should have them too) so that I could make one for myself.

Materials from hardware store:

One 1-1/2″ x 8″ heavy lead pipe
One 1-1/2″ cap
One 3/4″ x 10″ heavy lead pipe
Two 3/4″ caps

From a glass supply company:
Glass Frit Sifter set (I love this set!!)

The coffee grinder just doesn’t do it for me, and like many glass artists, I’ve been hammering the glass in plastic bags to make my frit. Now I just put my glass in the 1-1/2″ pipe and use the capped 3/4″ pipe to crush the glass. Then I poor the contents into the glass sifter set which separates the sizes of the frit. I then poor the frit into my 2-oz. storage containers (a gold-mine find at a local thrift store).

The caps aren’t flat, so I have to store the frit maker on its side. I’m sure you could flatten the cap. But, I’m not particular. I’m just thrilled to have this! The weight of the capped 3/4″ lead pipe makes it quick and easy for me to make my own frit. And, to make the “crusher 3/4″ pipe” even heavier I threw in some heavy fishing weights (a garage sale find). Rocks, lead balls, or anything else you can find to add some weight to it will work just as well. Smile

Happy crushing!

Please see my new blog for official instructions on this rubber channel. http://shoozles-wearyourart.blogspot.com/2008/09/hidden-rubber-channel-alternative-to.html

When I started fusing 8 years ago, the silver bails you see on pendants were nowhere to be found so all my pendants were made with a channel that was made with fiber paper. The fiber paper does not burn in the kiln therefore it leaves a channel/hole that goes through the glass pendant. It was all I knew when I began fusing, then I discovered wire wrapping and that evolved then came the standard silver bails. I am as usual looking for innovated ways to make pendants look and function different. Early this summer I started making sterling silver roll bails those are nice too and it really steps up the piece since the silver is expensive and I necklaceon2.jpgmake the bails by hand. Within the last few weeks I have been working on a new way to wear the pendants- A no bail alternative to all these other devices.1tubedetail.jpg

This is called the hidden rubber channel. I spent some time wearing and testing the strength of this and have found it to be quite nice, not to mention how great is lays on a neck, plus comfort. I have to say the thing I like best about it -NO BAIL, the piece stands on it’s own like art hanging in a gallery.

If you have any questions about the hidden rubber channel jurubberbail.jpgst drop me a line. Trust me it is a great new way to wear pendants. To find products with this alternative channel go to http://shoozles.etsy.com